Skip to main content

Fisheries in Thailand

In 1952, His Majesty invited officials of the Department of Fisheries to use wells in the grounds of Chitralada Villa, Dusit Palace as fish breeding grounds. The variety he chose to propagate was the Tilapia mosambica (Pla Mo Thet, in Thai). It was a fast-growing species and if introduced into rice fields in the planting season, it could be harvested by the farmer when the rice was ready for the sickle. The fish would fatten on small pests and vegetation, and provide farm families with protein. The investment was small and the gains were large. Rice and fish: the staples of the rural Thai diet. In March 1965, a superior species, Tilapia nilotica, was donated by a fellow rural agronomist, Japan's Crown Prince Akihito, later to become the Emperor of Japan. Since then, tens of millions of the fingerlings have been given to Thai farmers free of charge to raise in their fields. Today, Pla Nin (Black Fish), as it is known in Thai, is a favorite on the dining mat of every Thai farm family. At the request of the FAO and UNICEF, His Majesty donated 500,000 tilapia to the People's Republic of Bangladesh to alleviate famine and promote their own fish propagation programmes.

 

 

 

Share this article

thailandtoday thailandtoday thailandtoday

thailandtoday thailandtoday thailandtoday

thailandtoday thailandtoday thailandtoday

thailandtoday thailandtoday thailandtoday

thailandtoday thailandtoday thailandtoday

thailandtoday thailandtoday thailandtoday

thailandtoday thailandtoday thailandtoday