Skip to main content

Soil Erosion

His Majesty advised planting rows of fruit trees interspersed with upland crops to prevent soil erosion. Tamarind trees were chosen for their roots' ability to hold the soil together. In 1987, he suggested that water should be impounded so the nutrients would be available to trees and plants downstream by carving shallow diamond-shaped "polders" into the hillside. Trees were planted at the intersections of the diamonds to receive water from two uphill directions. A second approach was to sculpt terraces at intervals on upland rice field so that fruit trees planted on the terraces would be irrigated by water flowing out of the rice fields. Short-term crops could also be planted to maximise the run-off. Plant remains would also serve to nourish the trees. Another notable approach advised by His Majesty to prevent soil erosion is to plant vetiver grass whose long and complex root system is prized as a soil binder. At the Bhuphan Royal Development Study Centre in Thailand's Northeast, experiments carried out with vetiver grass have yielded promising results. In recognition of His Majesty's role in soil and water conservation, the World Bank presented a bronze-plated Vetiver Sculpture Award in 1993 to His Majesty.

Share this article

thailandtoday thailandtoday thailandtoday

thailandtoday thailandtoday thailandtoday

thailandtoday thailandtoday thailandtoday

thailandtoday thailandtoday thailandtoday

thailandtoday thailandtoday thailandtoday

thailandtoday thailandtoday thailandtoday

thailandtoday thailandtoday thailandtoday