Skip to main content

Political parties agree on need for sustainable democracy

Representatives of Thailand’s two largest and opposing political parties agreed publicly last week that charter drafters and reformers need to produce a draft constitution that will satisfy most Thais, even if formulating such a charter takes longer than originally anticipated and leads to elections being held later than expected.
 
Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha and the National Council for Peace and Order (NCPO) had drawn a roadmap for a return to electoral democracy by late 2015 or early 2016. The roadmap includes the drafting of national reforms and a new constitution. So far, the government and related organizations tasked with implementing the roadmap have adhered closely to its timetable.
 
However, political parties and civil society groups have criticized some aspects of the draft constitution. Some analysts have said that the new electoral system spelled out in the charter will lead to weak coalition governments that will be unlikely to provide Thailand with the strong leadership it needs.
 
Charter drafters, on the other hand, believe their constitution will empower the people and give them greater leverage to serve as a check and balance on politicians.
 
Representatives of Thailand’s two leading political parties, the Pheu Thai party and the Democrat Party, along political activists and representatives of the media, met with members of the NCPO’s Reconciliation Committee at a meeting organized by the Committee last week to sound out opinions on the charter and the reconciliation process.
 
Worachai Hema, a Pheu Thai politician and one of the leaders of the Red Shirt street protest movement, said that representatives from his party and Democrats agreed that it was acceptable if the next general election were delayed as long as the new constitution is democratic.
 
He said that politicians from both parties wanted the new charter to address the issues of political conflict, reconciliation and democracy. He called for a public referendum on the constitution.
 
Several Western governments have repeatedly called on the NCPO to organize elections as soon as possible, but NCPO leaders have said they need time to draft workable reforms for the country so that when a democratic system is restored it will be sustainable.
 
Phayaw Akkahad, whose daughter was killed during political unrest five years ago, described the meeting in which she took part as a move to “seek reconciliation between politicians and the NCPO.”
 
Meeting participant and Red Shirt co-leader Natawut Saikua, who was also a Deputy Minister of Commerce in the Pheu Thai government, said reconciliation could only be achieved when there was equality among people and a balance of power among many groups.
 
See the original artcicle at Thailand Focus

Share this article

thailandtoday thailandtoday thailandtoday

thailandtoday thailandtoday thailandtoday

thailandtoday thailandtoday thailandtoday

thailandtoday thailandtoday thailandtoday

thailandtoday thailandtoday thailandtoday

thailandtoday thailandtoday thailandtoday

thailandtoday thailandtoday thailandtoday